Copper Recycling Nets Quick Cash for All

As the nationwide recession continues to put the squeeze on your brain and your wallet, you may find yourself looking around your house with the old “yard sale stare.” “I could probably get a buck-fifty for that old lamp,” or, “when was the last time I even plugged in that sewing machine?” While the re-selling…

As the nationwide recession continues to put the squeeze on your brain and your wallet, you may find yourself looking around your house with the old “yard sale stare.” “I could probably get a buck-fifty for that old lamp,” or, “when was the last time I even plugged in that sewing machine?” While the re-selling and reuse of the retired odds and ends collecting dust in your house can breathe a little wiggle room into your budget, you may want to give some consideration to the retired odds and ends collecting rust in your garage.

Many of the unsellable items that will wind up being boxed for another yard sale five years down the road, where it still might wind up taking up space in your house, contain components that can be converted into some quick cash at a recycling plant. Scrap recyclers are always on the hunt for some precious pieces of aluminum, brass, copper, and steel that can be melted down and turned back out into the market as new products. Maybe you will not wind up with the quarter you were asking for your busted blender, but you can turn the metal into some quick change, get rid of a cumbersome nuisance around the house, and walk away knowing that you're helping combat the growing perception that everything is disposable. Copper especially has been viewed more and more as a precious commodity, its price rising over $ 1.50 / lb. since.

This may sound a little trifling or tiresome-maybe you'd rather just throw out these items, even if they do have a few cents hidden inside of them. But if it's such a pain in the neck to do all this work, why are copper-rich appliances such as air conditioners being targeted by the poster-children for the quick buck? Thieves, wise to the easy and lucrative nature of recycling copper components at a plant, have begun searching out these commodities, destroying private property to get to them. The damage they cause is often much higher in cost than the components they steal, so do not go ripping open easily salvageable appliances with dreams of swimming in money off of the proceeds from its copper wiring, just be aware the next time you're locking up your valuables for the night that you may be missing something.

If thieves were looking for a fair work to payment ratio, they would likely go get a job like the rest of us; instead they are looking for the smallest amount of work with the highest monetary yield they can, and one activity they have rated as such is the recycling of these materials. If this is easy enough for someone like a thief who trades in easy money, you're only cheating yourself by not jumping on this possibility. Look on the web for some unused things you have-you may be surprised at what might hold some material that could easily be turned into some quick cash through scrap recycling.